Word:

Unity of possession

UNITY OF POSSESSION. This term is used to designate the possession by one person of several estates or rights. For example, a right to an estate to which an easement is attached, or the dominant estate, and to an estate which an easement encumbers, or the servient estate, in such case the easement is extinguished. 3 Mason, Rep. 172; Poph. 166; Latch, 153; and vide Cro. Jac. 121. But a distinction has been made between a thing that has being by prescription, and one that has its being ex jure naturae; in the former case unity of possession will extinguish the easement; in the latter, for example, the case of a water course, the unity will not extinguish it. Poth. 166.
     2. By the civil code of Louisiana, art. 801, every servitude is extinguished, when the estate to which it is due, and the estate owing it, are united in the same hands. But it is necessary that the whole of the two estates should belong to the same proprietor; for if the owner of one estate only acquires the other in part or in common with another person, confusion does not take effect. Vide Merger.

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United States Virgin Islands
United States waters
United Technologies Research Cente
Unitedly
Uniter
Uniterable
uniting
Unition
unitisation
unitise
Unitive
Unitively
unitization
Unitize
Unitude
Unity
-- Unity of possession --
Unity of type
Univac
Univalence
Univalent
Univalve
Univalvia
Univalvular
Univariant
Universal
universal agent
Universal algebra
Universal arithmetic
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter
Universal Character Set
Universal chuck
Universal church
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