Word:

Ransom

Ran´som   Pronunciation: răn´sŭm
n.1.The release of a captive, or of captured property, by payment of a consideration; redemption; as, prisoners hopeless of ransom.
2.The money or price paid for the redemption of a prisoner, or for goods captured by an enemy; payment for freedom from restraint, penalty, or forfeit.
Thy ransom paid, which man from death redeems.
- Milton.
His captivity in Austria, and the heavy ransom he paid for his liberty.
- Sir J. Davies.
3.(O. Eng. Law) A sum paid for the pardon of some great offense and the discharge of the offender; also, a fine paid in lieu of corporal punishment.
Ransom bill
(Law) a war contract, valid by the law of nations, for the ransom of property captured at sea and its safe conduct into port.
- Kent.
v. t.1.To redeem from captivity, servitude, punishment, or forfeit, by paying a price; to buy out of servitude or penalty; to rescue; to deliver; as, to ransom prisoners from an enemy.
[imp. & p. p. Ransomed (-sŭmd); p. pr. & vb. n. Ransoming.]
2.To exact a ransom for, or a payment on.
Noun1.Ransomransom - money demanded for the return of a captured person
Synonyms: ransom money
2.ransom - payment for the release of someone
3.ransom - the act of freeing from captivity or punishment
Verb1.ransom - exchange or buy back for money; under threat
Synonyms: redeem

RANSOM, contracts, war. An agreement made between the commander of a capturing vessel with the commander of a vanquished vessel, at sea, by which the former permits the latter to depart with his vessel, and gives him a safe conduct, in consideration of a sum of money, which the commander of the vanquished vessel, in his own name, and in the name of the owners of his vessel and cargo, promises to pay at a future time named, to the other.
     2. This contract is usually made in writing in duplicate, one of which is kept by the vanquished vessel which is its safe conduct; and the other by the conquering vessel, which is properly called ransom bill.
     3. This contract, when made in good faith, and not locally prohibited, is valid, and may be enforced. Such contracts have never been prohibited in this country. 1 Kent, Com. 105. In England they are generally forbidden. Chit. Law of Nat. 90 91; Poth. Tr. du Dr. de Propr. n. 127. Vide 2 Bro. Civ. Law, 260; Wesk. 435; 7 Com. Dig. 201; Marsh. Ins. 431; 2 Dall. 15; 15 John. 6; 3 Burr. 1734. The money paid for the redemption of such property is also called the ransom.

To dream that somebody is demanding ransom from you, signifies that you have been deceived.buy, deliver, delivery, emancipate, extract, extricate, extrication, free, freeing, get back, liberate, liberation, lifesaving, payment, price, recapture, reclaim, reclaiming, reclamation, recoup, recoupment, recover, recovery, recuperate, recuperation, recycle, redeem, redemption, regain, regainment, renovate, reoccupation, reoccupy, replevin, replevy, repossess, repossession, rescue, restoration, restore, resume, resumption, retake, retaking, retrieval, retrieve, revindicate, revindication, revival, revive, salvage, salvation, save, saving, set free, take back, trover, win back
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rank-order correlation
rank-order correlation coefficient
ranked
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Rankine
Rankine scale
ranking
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Rankly
Rankness
Rannel
Ranny
Ransack
ransacked
ransacking
-- Ransom --
Ransom bill
ransom money
Ransomable
ransomed
Ransomer
Ransomless
Rant
Ranter
Ranterism
ranting
Rantingly
Rantipole
Rantism
Ranty
Ranula
Ranunculaceae
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